MnTC | Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum — 2014-2015

The Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) is the format in which general education is accomplished within the public two- and four-year colleges and universities in Minnesota. The MnTC defines a common curriculum format for general education. Completion of a defined MnTC course(s) at one institution enables a student to receive credit for lower-division general education MnTC coursework upon admission to other MnSCU colleges and universities and the University of Minnesota.

DCTC provides general education in the MnTC format and accepts MnTC courses from other MnSCU colleges and universities and from the University of Minnesota campuses.

Students who complete the entire general education transfer curriculum have shown competency in 10 goal areas. DCTC offers courses that meet all of the 10 goal areas. Students transferring these courses to other colleges transfer on a course-by-course basis. Courses approved for the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum are identified in DCTC publications by the MnTC goal number(s).

Transfer of MnTC Courses

MnTC courses with a grade of D or better are eligible for transfer into DCTC. Such courses transfer according to the MnTC goal areas designated for them by the sending institutions. Completion of the entire goal at another MnSCU institution completes the goal at DCTC. Per MnSCU policy, a combined cumulative GPA (for both DCTC and transfer courses) of 2.0 or higher is required in order for DCTC verify completion of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum.

GOAL 1 — Communication

To develop writers and speakers who use the English language effectively and who read, write, speak and listen critically. As a base, all students should complete introductory communication requirements early in their collegiate studies. MnTC completion requires three courses, one must be ENGL1150, and one SPEE.

Description
ENGL 1125 This course focuses on effective, persuasive communication within and between business organizations, from the perspective of employees and of mangers. Students learn to critically analyze communication strategies, organizational culture and common business texts, such as memos, reports and case studies; they learn to select quality data from primary and secondary sources; and they write and edit letters, memos, reports and studies in situations that simulate the complexities of small companies and global corporations. Students will also gain experience making an oral presentation with accompanying presentation and software slides, work as part of a collaborative team, and recognize the ethical implications of business communication. This course is not a substitute for ENGL1150 Composition I.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/13/2014 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1

Course Outline: ENGL1125

ENGL 1125 Business Writing 3
Description
ENGL 1150 This course emphasizes the process of writing expository and persuasive essays using effective writing skills and a variety of research techniques. Also included in the course content are critical reading and logical reasoning. Meets MnTC Goal 1 - PREREQUISITES: Student must score an 86 or above on the Accuplacer Sentence Skills assessment OR complete developmental courses through English Essentials AND score a 78 or higher on the Accuplacer Reading Comprehension Assessment OR complete College Reading I or II.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/24/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1

Course Outline: ENGL1150

ENGL 1150 Composition I 3
Description
ENGL 1200 This course is designed to enhance students' abilities to write technical documents. The content covered will include proposals, research reports, technical manuals, feasibility studies, and process reports. Meets MnTC Goal 1

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 03/23/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1

Course Outline: ENGL1200

ENGL 1200 Technical Writing 3
Description
ENGL 1355 How can writing present complex arguments - and require critical thinking skills to develop answers? Is there more than just what is on the surface? How can a student intelligently challenge what is written in a text or even what is offered on the Internet? Students read, compose, analyze, and engage in interesting and rigorous discussions of selected plays and texts. Concepts of audience, purpose, and context are studied and evaluated. Students will learn how to discuss critically, synthesize key components, and provide analysis orally and in writing. This course is not an alternative to Composition 1101. Meets MnTC Goal 1

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/22/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1,2

Course Outline: ENGL1355

ENGL 1355 Critical Reading and Writing 3
Description
ENGL 2000 This course will offer challenging insights into the act of writing. Students will continue to strengthen their writing skills while engaging in analysis of literary texts and secondary sources. In writing critical essays based on that analysis, students will apply rhetorical strategies related to purpose, audience, genre and context. Meets MnTC Goal 1

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/23/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1

Course Outline: ENGL2000

ENGL 2000 Composition II 3
Description
SPEE 1015 This speech course introduces students to the factors involved in becoming efficient communicators in both individual and group presentations. The course emphasis will be placed on audience analysis, research and organization, speech construction, and delivery techniques. Meets MnTC Goal 1

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 07/01/2001 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1

Course Outline: SPEE1015

SPEE 1015 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3
Description
SPEE 1042 This course provides instruction in theory and practice in the application of skills learned in the study of small group communication principles. Students will spend a substantial part of their course time participating in small groups, completing group projects, and analyzing group interaction. Meets MnTC Goal 1.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/07/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1

Course Outline: SPEE1042

SPEE 1042 Small Group Communication 3
Description
SPEE 1050 Includes facial expressions, tones of voice, gestures, eye contact, spatial arrangements, patterns of touch, expressive movement, cultural differences, and other "nonverbal" acts. Research suggests that nonverbal communication is more important in understanding human behavior than words alone--the nonverbal "channels" seem to be more powerful that what people say. Meets MnTC Goal 1.

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 08/01/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1

Course Outline: SPEE1050

SPEE 1050 Nonverbal Communication 2

GOAL 2 — Critical Thinking

Students will be able to gather and use factual information to make logical assumptions, interpretations or connections.  Critical thinking will be taught and used throughout the general education and technical curriculum to develop student’s awareness of their own thinking and problem-solving procedures. This goal can be met in one of the following three ways: 1) by completion of one course; 2) by completion of Goal 1 and a technical program; 3) by completion of the entire MnTC.

Description
ENGL 1355 How can writing present complex arguments - and require critical thinking skills to develop answers? Is there more than just what is on the surface? How can a student intelligently challenge what is written in a text or even what is offered on the Internet? Students read, compose, analyze, and engage in interesting and rigorous discussions of selected plays and texts. Concepts of audience, purpose, and context are studied and evaluated. Students will learn how to discuss critically, synthesize key components, and provide analysis orally and in writing. This course is not an alternative to Composition 1101. Meets MnTC Goal 1

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/22/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 1,2

Course Outline: ENGL1355

ENGL 1355 Critical Reading and Writing 3
Description
PHIL 1200 In this course, students will develop skills in argument evaluation, the use of informal logic, and language analysis as they criticize problems found on the World Wide Web, in the workplace, and in other everyday environments. Students will also have an opportunity to explore topics in media literacy and the philosophy of science. Suggested Accuplacer reading cut score over 78. Meets MnTC Goal 2.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/27/2007 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 2

Course Outline: PHIL1200

PHIL 1200 Critical Thinking 3
Description
PHIL 1450 In this introductory course, students will take a philosophical approach to thinking about painting, photography, film, architecture, music, literature, theater arts, and popular art. Using ideas from a variety of time periods, students will analyze artworks of their own choosing. All students will find this course valuable though it will be of special interest to those in programs such as Applied Visual Arts, Architectural Technology, Graphic Design Technology, Photography, Photographic Imaging Technology, Interior Design, Landscape Horticulture, Multimedia and Web Design.

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 03/01/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 2,6

Course Outline: PHIL1450

PHIL 1450 Philosophy of the Arts 2
Description
PSYC 1105 This general psychology course is an introduction and overview of the scientific study of behavior and experience. It includes topics like the history of psychology, research methods, perception, learning, human development, intelligence, motivation, social perception and group behavior, and psychological disorders.

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 05/21/2014 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 2,5

Course Outline: PSYC1105

PSYC 1105 General Psychology 4

GOAL 3 — Natural Sciences

To improve students' understanding of natural science principles and of the methods of scientific inquiry, i.e., the ways in which scientists investigate natural science phenomena. By studying the problems that engage today's scientists, students learn to appreciate the importance of science in their lives and to understand the value of a scientific perspective. MnTC Completion requires two courses of two different disciplines; at least one must be a lab course.

Description
BIOL 1110 This course emphasizes the fundamental concepts of ecology as it pertains to the impact of humans on their environment. It addresses the demands placed on the biosphere by the exploitation of natural resources and energy, the creation of pollution and the disposal of waste. This course is interdisciplinary, combining concepts from the natural and physical sciences (e.g. biology, chemistry, geology, physics) with the social sciences (e.g. economics, politics, ethics, history) to present an understanding of how wise stewardship of earth's resources can result in the long-term sustainability of our shared environment. Meets MnTC Goal 3 and MnTC Goal 10

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 02/24/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3,10

Course Outline: BIOL1110

BIOL 1110 Environmental Science 3
Description
BIOL 1120 This course covers the natural habitats of Minnesota and the plants and animals that live in them. It includes such topics as our physical environment, ecology, and animal traits and behaviors such as mimicry or migration. Human interactions with these habitats are stressed. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 06/01/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: BIOL1120

BIOL 1120 Minnesota Nature Study 3
Description
BIOL 1310 This lecture and laboratory-based course is designed for introductory study of human organ systems (integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and urogenital) by structure and function. Cellular function, human reproduction, development, and heredity are other topics integrated into the biology of the human body. Carefully check your program requirements for acceptability of this course. It does not replace the two course sequence of anatomy and physiology required for many advanced health programs. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/23/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: BIOL1310

BIOL 1310 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology 4
Description
BIOL 1400 An inquiry-based course that covers the fundamental principles of ecology, conservation, and sustainability. Students will have the opportunity to learn through laboratory, field work, and lecture activities. Topics include biodiversity, a survey of biomes, populations, interrelationships in biological communities, ecological succession, energy flow, nutrient cycling, physiological ecology, and human impacts on ecosystems. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 01/14/2008 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: BIOL1400

BIOL 1400 Ecology Field Studies 4
Description
BIOL 1500 This course surveys the basic principles of biology. Content topics include fundamental concepts of cellular structure and metabolism, inheritance, biodiversity, ecology, and evolution. The lab component includes application of concepts with an emphasis on observation, the scientific method, and analysis. This course provides a foundation for students pursuing health-related careers as well as those in non-science majors. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/01/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: BIOL1500

BIOL 1500 General Biology 4
Description
BIOL 2000 This course is the first semester of a two-semester lab-science course intended for students pursuing careers in fitness and allied health fields. Human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. Homeostasis is an integrating theme throughout this course. Content topics include basic anatomical and directional terminology, fundamental concepts and principles of cell physiology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Dissection of individual organs and whole organisms may be included. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/01/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: BIOL2000

BIOL 2000 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
Description
BIOL 2010 This course is the second semester of a two-semester lab-science course intended for students pursuing careers in fitness and allied health fields. Human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. Homeostasis is an integrating theme throughout this course. Content topics include immunity, metabolism, fluid balance, development, and the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Dissection of individual organs and whole organisms may be included. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/01/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: BIOL2010

BIOL 2010 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
Description
BIOL 2020 An introduction to Microbiology with a focus on microbe classification and biology, disease transmission, and pathogenesis, the immune response, and isolation and identification laboratory practices. Emphasis will be on microorganisms that cause local and systemic disease in humans with consideration of treatment options as well as infection control and prevention strategies. This course is intended for nursing students and other students pursuing careers in allied health fields. Meets MnTC Goal 3 Prerequisite BIOL1500

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 02/01/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: BIOL2020

BIOL 2020 Microbiology 4
Description
CHEM 1500 This course is a broad introduction to chemistry - its principles and applications. It is intended for the non-science major. Topics include the scientific method, atomic structure, periodic table, general properties of matter, the development of the model of the atom, basics of chemical bonding, chemical equations and their uses, acids and bases, and oxidation reduction. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 06/01/2004 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: CHEM1500

CHEM 1500 Introduction to Chemistry 4
Description
PHYS 1050 This is an introductory course in Physics and its applications. The course is designed for individuals with no previous experience in physics. In this course students will learn basic theory and application of classical physics in everyday life, and how to apply that knowledge through problem solving, simulation, and laboratory experiments. Topics to be covered include: linear and rotational motion, vectors, forces and equilibrium, work and energy, momentum, properties of solids, liquids and gases, heat and thermodynamics, and waves and sound. Meets MnTC Goal 3

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 11/05/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: PHYS1050

PHYS 1050 Introduction to Physics 3
Description
PHYS 1100 This course is the first of two courses that cover non-calculus physics topics. These topics include: mechanics, concepts of energy and momentum, basic laws of motion, structure of matter, gas laws, heat and thermodynamics, waves and sound. Meets MnTC Goal 3. Prerequisites: None.

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/21/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: PHYS1100

PHYS 1100 College Physics I 4
Description
PHYS 1200 This course is the second of two courses that cover non-calculus physics topics. These topics include: fluids, thermal physics, direct and alternating currents, magnetism, light and optics, waves, and topics in modern physics. Meets MnTC goal 3. Prerequisites: None.

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 01/09/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3

Course Outline: PHYS1200

PHYS 1200 College Physics II 4

GOAL 4 — Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

To increase students’ knowledge about mathematical and logical modes of thinking. This will enable students to appreciate the breadth of applications of mathematics, evaluate arguments, and detect fallacious reasoning. MnTC completion requires one course that is at least three credits.

Description
MATS 1251 Fundamental principles of inferential statistics are presented in lecture and supplemented with computer labs using Minitab software. Specific topics include descriptive and graphical statistics, fundamentals of counting and probability, probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression, chi-square tests, ANOVA, and nonparametrics. Meets MnTC Goal 4

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/21/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 4

Course Outline: MATS1251

MATS 1251 Statistics 4
Description
MATS 1300 This course develops a student's ability to analyze and work with functions and graphs, as part of the preparation for a rigorous calculus sequence (taking this course together with MATS1320 is equivalent to precalculus). Topics include tests for symmetry, finding intercepts and asymptotes, constructing piece wise-defined functions, transformations, polynomial and rational functions, composite and inverse functiions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Techniques for solving linear, quadratic, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic equations (with applications) are emphasized throughout the course. Systems of linear equations and matrix algebra are introduced, after wich sequences and series are also briefly introduced. Meets MnTC Goal 4

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 06/01/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 4

Course Outline: MATS1300

MATS 1300 College Algebra 4
Description
MATS 1320 A foundation in trigonometry which, taken with college algebra, prepares students for a rigorous calculus sequence. Topics include right-triangle trigonometry, the laws of sines and cosines, the unit circle, trigonometric graphs with transformations, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric equations, polar coordinates, complex numbers and vectors. Meets MnTC Goal 4.

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 08/21/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 4

Course Outline: MATS1320

MATS 1320 College Trigonometry 2
Description
MATS 1350 A college level course designed to build a student's appreciation of both the beauty and utility of mathematics as it is used in society. Topics include voting and apportionment, fair division, scheduling and route planning, patterns of growth, and basic probability and statistics concepts including the bell curve. NOTE that this course does not serve as a prerequisite for any other math course. Meets MnTC Goal 4

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 06/02/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 4

Course Outline: MATS1350

MATS 1350 Math for Liberal Arts 4
Description
MATS 1500 This course is designed for students who wish to explore the foundations of calculus in a more mathematically rigorous way than in MATS1480. The course begins with college trigonometry topics, including the six trigonometric functions and their inverses, the law of sines/law of cosines, radian measure and the unit circle, trigonometric identities and solving trigonometric equations. Fundamental concepts of calculus are then developed, including limits and continuity, differentiation of polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions with applications, and integration by numerical and exact methods with applications. Mathematical modeling with differential equations is also introduced.

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/22/2005 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 4

Course Outline: MATS1500

MATS 1500 Beginning Calculus with Trig 4
Description
PHIL 1250 Students will learn to identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments derived from real-world problems using skills in formal logic. Concepts in informal logic will not be covered. Prerequisites: Accuplacer score of 78 or higher in Reading Comprehension OR College Reading I, AND Accuplacer score of 51 or higher in Elementary Algebra OR MATS0305 Introduction to Algebra. Meets MnTC Goal 4.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/13/2014 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 4

Course Outline: PHIL1250

PHIL 1250 Introduction to Logic 3

GOAL 5 — History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

To increase students’ knowledge of how historians and social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions, events, and ideas. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity. MnTC completion requires three courses from at least two disciplines.

Description
ECON 1000 This course is an introduction to the literature and vocabulary that is used in the field of economics. Also covered in the course will be an overview of the organization of the economy of the United States and how it relates to the rest of the world.

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 04/05/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: ECON1000

ECON 1000 Survey of American Economy 2
Description
ECON 1100 This course is an introduction to: price mechanisms, supply and demand, resource allocation, analysis of market structures, distribution of income, and business decisions with regard to cost analysis. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 06/03/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: ECON1100

ECON 1100 Microeconomics 3
Description
ECON 1200 This course analyzes the interactions between all segments of the economic system. The course will focus on savings and investment, aggregate supply and aggregate demand, the monetary system, unemployment and inflation, and fiscal policy. Additional topics may include the balance of payments and currency exchange rates determination. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/12/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: ECON1200

ECON 1200 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
Description
HIST 1100 This class is a survey of American history from early Native Americans to Reconstruction. It consists of a combination of primary and secondary sources that focus on the major political and social changes of America to 1877. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 01/06/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: HIST1100

HIST 1100 History of the United States to 1877 4
Description
HIST 1200 This course will survey the major historical events of the United States from 1877 to the present. The text emphasizes political and social developments while the secondary readings provide a closer examination of this period's major themes. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/22/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: HIST1200

HIST 1200 History of the U.S. from 1877 to the Present 4
Description
HIST 1250 This course is designed to introduce students to the caried experiences of women in America from pre-contact until the present time. It also explores the various ways gender has shaped society in America. Topics covered include women's involvement in and the impact on women of European settlement, slavery, revolution, nation building, reform, industrialization, depression, war and second-wave feminism. Using primary and secondary sources, students will explore the racial and ethnic diversity of women in America and how their experiences have changed over time. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/21/2012 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: HIST1250

HIST 1250 Women in America 1490-Present 3
Description
HIST 1300 Big History is a new approach to World History that widens the scale of study from a few thousand years to the entire past. Rather than studying World History through the lenses of different cultures, nations, and civilizations, Big History starts 13 billion years ago and attempts to place the human species in the context of the universe. This course begins with the scientific account of the universe's beginnings and then describes the formation of the earth including its flora and fauna. The majority of the course concentrates on the major trends and developments of human societies from the Paleolithic, throughout the agararian, and into the modern era. Prerequisites: College reading level recommended. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 8

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 05/16/2005 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,8

Course Outline: HIST1300

HIST 1300 World History 4
Description
HIST 1350 This course is a historical introduction to World War II including analysis of such topics as the causes of war and peace; strategy, tactics, and technologies in the major theaters; political and military leadership; and war crimes. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/21/2012 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: HIST1350

HIST 1350 World War II 3
Description
HIST 1400 This 100% on-line lecture course examines the interaction between humans and the natural world in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. In addition, heavy emphasis is placed on recent Minnesota environmental history. The course considers such diverse topics as the industrialization and urban growth on the environment, the emergence of ecology and green politics, and creation of the idea of Nature in American culture. Students will be expected to develop a historical understanding of the major themes of modern American environmental history; relationships between human activity and pollution in cities, emergence of reform movements and environmental regulations, relationships between increasing urban growth and increasing environmental concern, and the rise of environmental politics in both local and national settings. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 10

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/15/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,10

Course Outline: HIST1400

HIST 1400 American Environmental History 3
Description
HIST 1450 This 3 credit history course explores the history of Minnesota from the ice age and early Native Americans to the events of today. Through a combination of three textbooks, internet sites and field trip visits to historical sites students can gain an appreciation of the contributions made by those who came before us in the state we now call Minnesota. Prerequisties: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/25/2008 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: HIST1450

HIST 1450 The History of Minnesota 3
Description
HIST 1500 This course examines the nature of the Western world and how it has shaped the men and women who are its heirs. Students will understand the role Western civilization has and is playing in the worldwide civilization of the present day. The course focuses on the outstanding institutions, ideas, and creative works that have formed (and expressed) Western civilization, as well as on Western interactions with other civilizations in the past and present. As Shakespeare observed, "What's past is prologue." Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/15/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: HIST1500

HIST 1500 History of Western Civilization 3
Description
HIST 1500 This course examines the nature of the Western world and how it has shaped the men and women who are its heirs. Students will understand the role Western civilization has and is playing in the worldwide civilization of the present day. The course focuses on the outstanding institutions, ideas, and creative works that have formed (and expressed) Western civilization, as well as on Western interactions with other civilizations in the past and present. As Shakespeare observed, "What's past is prologue." Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/15/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: HIST1500

HIST 1500 History of Western Civilization 3
Description
POLS 1000 Introduction to Political Science will present a broad introduction to the basic concepts, approaches, and areas of study of political science. Discussion and active debate of key political ideologies: liberalism, conservatism, socialism, communism, fascism, nationalism, feminism, and environmentalism will be central to the course. The class will also delve into the specific political systems and institutions of key members of the international community as well as consider contemporary American political issues. Prerequisites: CPT reading score. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/12/2004 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: POLS1000

POLS 1000 Introduction to Political Science 3
Description
POLS 1100 This course is a survey of American Government with a focus on political theory and history, the U.S. Constitution, the branches of the federal government, and the concept of civil liberties and rights. Students will be introduced to the party system and political process in the U.S., the impact of public opinion, mass media/Internet, and interest groups. And overview of public policy and state and local government will also be provided. Prerequisites: None.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/21/2012 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: POLS1100

POLS 1100 The American Political System 3
Description
PSYC 1100 This general psychology course is an introduction and overview of the scientific study of behavior and experience. It includes topics like perception, learning, human development, intelligence, motivation, psychological disorders, social perception and group behavior. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 04/13/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: PSYC1100

PSYC 1100 General Psychology 3
Description
PSYC 1105 This general psychology course is an introduction and overview of the scientific study of behavior and experience. It includes topics like the history of psychology, research methods, perception, learning, human development, intelligence, motivation, social perception and group behavior, and psychological disorders.

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 05/21/2014 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 2,5

Course Outline: PSYC1105

PSYC 1105 General Psychology 4
Description
PSYC 1200 This psychology course is an introduction and overview of psychopathology. This course discusses diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of patients with mental health disorders and issues impacting mental health professionals. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 02/25/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: PSYC1200

PSYC 1200 Abnormal Psychology 3
Description
PSYC 1300 This psychology course is an introduction and overview of the scientific study of child development from prenatal through adolescence. It includes topics like perception, learning, intelligence, motivation, developmental disorders, and parenting and peer influence on the developing child. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 02/25/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: PSYC1300

PSYC 1300 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3
Description
PSYC 1350 This psychology course is an introduction and overview of the scientific study of development throughout the life span from prenatal through old age, death, dying and bereavement from a developmental perspective. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 7

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/24/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,7

Course Outline: PSYC1350

PSYC 1350 Lifespan Development 4
Description
PSYC 1400 This Adult psychology course is an introduction to adult and geriatric psychology from a lifespan perspective. This course examines topics from a developmental perspective, including sensation and perception, memory, intelligence and social cognition through adulthood. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior successful completion of PSYC1100. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 02/25/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: PSYC1400

PSYC 1400 Adult and Geriatric Psychology 2
Description
PSYC 1450 This psychology course is an introduction to the concepts and issues surrounding death and dying. It examines these issues from a theoretical perspective with attention to ethical and moral issues from a multicultural perspective and the impact of death, dying and bereavement throughout the lifespan. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 08/23/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: PSYC1450

PSYC 1450 Death and Dying 2
Description
PSYC 1600 This psychology course provides a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of the research findings and theories pertaining to human sexuality, and it helps the student apply this information to their personal lives. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 08/20/2001 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: PSYC1600

PSYC 1600 Human Sexuality 2
Description
SOCY 1010 This course embodies a survey of human relationships. This course will examine and explore both the practical side and the sociological side of human relationships. Topics include dealing with love, conflict, sexuality, parenting, relationship violence and gender roles. The focus of the course is to expose students to the cultural diversity of marriage and the family. To give students a fundamental understanding of the sociological perspective on this topic and apply a theoretical/historical perspective. Meets MnTC Goal 5

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 04/05/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5

Course Outline: SOCY1010

SOCY 1010 Marriage and the Family 3
Description
SOCY 1110 This course covers the basic concepts and terminology used in sociological studies. Sociology is broadly defined as the study of human social organization and social behavior including its forms and consequences. It will focus on the characteristics of human group life as they relate to the structure of the social environment and its influence on the individual. This course is designed to introduce students to the theories, concepts and areas of inquiry that typically characterize sociological analyses. Students will have the opportunity to examine the ethical/dimensions and issues facing political, social, and personal life as it relates to the topics in Sociology. Students will explore their own citizenship and find ways to apply their ideas and goals to civic learning and service learning through embracing facets of human society and the human condition. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 9

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 04/05/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: SOCY1110

SOCY 1110 Introduction to Sociology 3
Description
SOCY 1150 This course is designed to enable students to obtain a greater understanding of various minority/dominant relations in the United States. Global perspectives will also be addressed. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and Goal 7

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 01/13/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,7

Course Outline: SOCY1150

SOCY 1150 Race and Gender 2
Description
SOCY 1210 An examination of the many ways in which the United States is interconnected with other societies in a changing world. This changing globalization process and related problems that threaten human well-being are studied from a sociological perspective. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 8

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 12/28/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,8

Course Outline: SOCY1210

SOCY 1210 Social Issues Changing World 3
Description
SOCY 1250 A sociological examination of juvenile delinquency and society's response to delinquent youth. The juvenile justice system and the rights and responsibilities of children under law. Major topics include the historical foundations of delinquency, emphasis on micro and macro level of struggle in which delinquent behavior takes place, critique of current sociological theories on delinquency, sociological and social psychological causes of delinquency, juvenile justice response to delinquency, and citizen responsibility. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 9

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 01/13/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: SOCY1250

SOCY 1250 Juvenile Delinquency 2
Description
SOCY 1300 Anthropology is the scientific and humanistic study of humankind in all its varieties and of human nature in its universal sense. This course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology: archaeology, cultural anthropology, languages and culture, and physical anthropology. Students will learn to identify and apply anthropological methods of study through a sociological and anthropological approach to humanity. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and Goal 10

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/09/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,10

Course Outline: SOCY1300

SOCY 1300 Introduction to Anthropology 3
Description
SOCY 1400 This course will provide an overview of the philosophy of criminal law and deviance, and of the nature and extent of crime in America. The theory, structure, and operation of each of the principle components of the Criminal Justice System (ie. police, courts, and corrections) will be examined in detail. Major topics include the historical foundations of our Criminal Justice System, critique of current sociological theories on crime, analysis of impact of legal and social systems on human behavior, rehabilitation, public safety (including homeland security), and citizen responsibility. We will create a learning environment that takes into account all backgrounds and experiences where we can learn from one another.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 02/16/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: SOCY1400

SOCY 1400 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3

GOAL 6 — Humanities and Fine Arts

To expand students’ knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behavior, ideas and values expressed in works of human imagination and thought. Students will engage in critical analysis, form aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of the arts and humanities. MnTC completion requires two courses from two different disciplines.

Description
ARTS 1001 We live in a world that often places us in a position of visual overload. Images flood into our lives through television, print and social media. Although we innately interact with and react to the visual world, it is critical that the educated student learns to appreciate the production, history and the cultural relevance of visual art. This study includes perspectives on art from ancient times to present, but an emphasis is placed on the cultural significance of art from the modern era to the present time. By studying and making visual art, students will become more connected to the visual world around them and to their own avenues of artistic expression.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/10/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ARTS1001

ARTS 1001 Intro to Visual Arts 3
Description
ARTS 1101 This course will allow students to explore photography and its affects on culture by examining the origins of the medium. While it may seem that photography belongs only to the twentieth century, students will learn that the origins of the first camera date back hundreds of years. Early photographers were often "frustrated painters," and affected strongly by art and art history movements. This class then will begin with a review of the camera's beginnings and of the artistic cultural milieu that helped to bring the medium into adulthood in the twentieth century.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/10/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ARTS1101

ARTS 1101 History of Photography 3
Description
ARTS 1201 Much of the thinking learned in school and in the work environment place an emphasis on learning how to understand claims, follow or create a logical argument, figure out the answer, eliminate the incorrect paths and focus on the correct one. There is, however, another kind of thinking, centered on exploring ideas, generating possibilities, looking for many right answers rather than just the "correct" one. There is, however, another kind of thinking, centered on exploring ideas, generating possibilities, looking for many right answers rather than just the "correct" one. Both of these kinds of thinking are vital to success in the work place, yet the creative approach tends to be ignored until after the formal education is complete. In this course, we will explore the creative thought process and develop systems to encourage and develop new idea generation. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/10/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ARTS1201

ARTS 1201 The Creative Process 3
Description
ARTS 1310 This course will cover architecture from prehistory up to today, looking at examples throughout history and examining the issues that help shape them. The course will not only look at who designed the buildings, but who built them, who used them, and why. Beginning with the earliest manmade shelters and ending with issues influencing architecture today, the course will introduce students to different ways of seeing building and architecture as cultural artifacts. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/27/2012 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ARTS1310

ARTS 1310 History of Architecture 3
Description
ARTS 1550 This introductory course gives students a deeper appreciation and knowledge of Western art and the cultures that created it. This course focuses on the fascinating changes that occurred in the Italian Renaissance and continues through to modern artists and influences of the 20th century.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/14/2013 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ARTS1550

ARTS 1550 Art History, Renaissance to Modern 3
Description
ENGL 1300 This course introduces students to the fundamentals of creative writing. The elements of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and screenwriting are covered. Emphasis will be placed on both the writing process and the end product. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 06/01/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1300

ENGL 1300 Introduction to Creative Writing 3
Description
ENGL 1400 This course emphasizes the review and analysis of examples of the short story format. These stories will be by various American writers from the period 1789 to the present. Also included in the course content are critical reading and logical reasoning. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 02/23/2001 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1400

ENGL 1400 American Short Story 3
Description
ENGL 1550 This course introduces the study of literature as a mode of discourse for defining, exploring, and expressing human experience. There is an emphasis on learning the skills of reading and writing about literature. This course will cover fiction, drama, and poetry, with attention also paid to literary non-fiction. Thus the class will introduce students to such basic concepts as (for fiction) plot structure, point of view, characterization, imagery and symbolism, setting, tone, irony, and style; (for drama) protagonist/antagonist, plot, dramatic structure, tragedy and comedy; (for poetry) persona, denotation/connotation, figurative language, metrics and major verse forms. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/13/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1550

ENGL 1550 Introduction to Literature 3
Description
ENGL 1570 The Literature of Nature focuses on the understanding and analysis of humanity's relationship to its environment, as revealed through particular genres, such as the short story, essay, diary, and poetry. We will review the major texts in the literature of nature and look at the ethical and philosophical relationship between humans and nature over the centuries, focusing primarily on North America. Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 9

Credits:

Effective Dates: 11/05/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,9

Course Outline: ENGL1570

ENGL 1570 The Literature of Nature
Description
ENGL 1625 This course emphasizes the review and analysis of films. This will include how movies reflect and shape the hopes, dreams, and aspirations of the society that produces them. These films will be from various genres and span the entire time frame that movies have been a popular phenomenon. Also included in this course is logical reasoning as well as the investigation of certain aspects of film that set it apart from other literary forms such as technical advances, special effects, camera angles, costuming, cinematography, and lighting. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 01/08/2007 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1625

ENGL 1625 Film Studies 4
Description
ENGL 1630 This course emphasizes the review and analysis of focused genres of films. This will include how a genre reflects the society that produces them and how each genre transcends the limits of its formula. Also included in this course is logical reasoning. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 1

Effective Dates: 09/30/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1630

ENGL 1630 Genre Film 1
Description
ENGL 1650 This course emphasizes the review and analysis of various Greek myths. This will include how these myths have reflected and shaped art and history. Also included in the course are critical reading and logical reasoning. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/23/2004 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1650

ENGL 1650 Greek Mythology 4
Description
ENGL 1725 This course emphasizes the review and analysis of selected works of literature. Students will become familiar with the conventions, terminology and expectations of a particular genre of literature. In addition, students will research the authors and the historical times in which they lived. There will be an emphasis on reading literature actively, analyzing literature logically and writing about literature critically. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/11/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1725

ENGL 1725 Selected Works in Literature 3
Description
ENGL 1750 This course emphasizes review, analysis and discussions of the genres of fantasy and science fiction. Evaluations and points of view for these genres are also considered. The works are viewed as reflections of real contemporary issues in environmental, technological, cultural, religious, economic and political spheres, and the role of the world citizen dealing with these issues is discussed. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/10/2005 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1750

ENGL 1750 Fantasy and Science Fiction Literature 3
Description
ENGL 1800 This course introduces the study of mystery and detective literature. There is an emphasis on exploring the relationship between contemporary mystery fiction and the stories of antiquity. Students will read a wide variety of literature and explore the texts through a wide variety of literary approaches. The course will introduce students to such basic concepts as plot structure, point of view, characterization, imagery and symbolism, setting, tone, irony and style. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/08/2007 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1800

ENGL 1800 Mystery and Detective Literature 3
Description
ENGL 1900 This course emphasizes the process of critical reading and writing fiction using effective writing skills and figurative language. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/21/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: ENGL1900

ENGL 1900 Creative Writing Workshop in Fiction 3
Description
HUMA 1100 This course emphasizes eight disciplines as they have grown and influenced each other and the societies that produced them through the ages in western history. These disciplines are: literature, art, architecture, philosophy, music, science, religion, and technology. The course will include analysis of written text, pictures, and ideas. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/23/2004 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: HUMA1100

HUMA 1100 Introduction to Humanities 4
Description
HUMA 1125 This course emphasizes eight disciplines that make-up the humanities (literature, art, architecture, philosophy, music, science, religion, and technology) and looks at how Minnesotans are defining and influencing our local and national culture. The course will include analysis of written texts, art, architecture, music, science, performances, and ideas. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 11/05/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6

Course Outline: HUMA1125

HUMA 1125 The Humanities in Modern Minnesota 3
Description
PHIL 1300 This course is an introduction to the traditional problems of philosphy. Students will discuss and criticize texts written by philosophers from a variety of periods and cultures. Emphasis will be placed on the practical value of the ideas explored. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 9

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/14/2008 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,9

Course Outline: PHIL1300

PHIL 1300 Introduction to Philosphy 3
Description
PHIL 1350 This course introduces students to basic issues in medical ethics. Emphasis will be placed on the process of considering ethical theory, ethical principles, laws, and professional codes of onduct in the analysis of specific cases from the field. This course will be of special interest to students in nursing and dental programs, though students in any program will find the study of medical ethics worthwhile. Suggested Accuplacer reading cut score over 78 and completion of ENGL 1150: Composition I. Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 9

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/24/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,9

Course Outline: PHIL1350

PHIL 1350 Medical Ethics 3
Description
PHIL 1400 This course is about learning the central beliefs of the world's major religions. Through writing, reflection, and presentation, students will explore the basic tenets of the world's major religions, who founded the religion, their main writings or scriptures, and their philosophical underpinnings concerning such issues as definition of religion, the existence of God/gods, faith, reason, ceremonial practices, and their relationship with the world. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/12/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,8

Course Outline: PHIL1400

PHIL 1400 World Religions 3
Description
PHIL 1450 In this introductory course, students will take a philosophical approach to thinking about painting, photography, film, architecture, music, literature, theater arts, and popular art. Using ideas from a variety of time periods, students will analyze artworks of their own choosing. All students will find this course valuable though it will be of special interest to those in programs such as Applied Visual Arts, Architectural Technology, Graphic Design Technology, Photography, Photographic Imaging Technology, Interior Design, Landscape Horticulture, Multimedia and Web Design.

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 03/01/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 2,6

Course Outline: PHIL1450

PHIL 1450 Philosophy of the Arts 2

GOAL 7 — Human Diversity

To increase students’ understanding of individual and group differences (e.g., race, gender, class) and their knowledge of the traditions and values of various groups in the United States. Students should be able to evaluate the United States’ historical and contemporary responses to group differences. MnTC completion requires one course.

Description
HIST 1550 Historical introduction to the Vietnam War and the dramatic social, economic, cultural and political transformations of the Vietnam era. Includes the French Conquest, rise of nationalism, WWII and Cold War containment, secret CIA operations, civil rights movement, Environmental movement, Black Power, counterculture, political murder, anti-war movement, Watergate, Pentagon/VA transgressions, normalizations.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/23/2013 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 7,9

Course Outline: HIST1550

HIST 1550 America in the Vietnam Era 3
Description
PSYC 1350 This psychology course is an introduction and overview of the scientific study of development throughout the life span from prenatal through old age, death, dying and bereavement from a developmental perspective. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 7

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 08/24/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,7

Course Outline: PSYC1350

PSYC 1350 Lifespan Development 4
Description
SOCY 1150 This course is designed to enable students to obtain a greater understanding of various minority/dominant relations in the United States. Global perspectives will also be addressed. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and Goal 7

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 01/13/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,7

Course Outline: SOCY1150

SOCY 1150 Race and Gender 2
Description
SPEE 1020 This course focuses on the practical and theoretical concepts of human communications and the styles used in personal, social and professional environments. Students will also acquire skills in critical thinking, perception, listening, emotional communication, verbal and non-verbal expressions and conflict resolution. Meets MnTC Goal 7

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 03/26/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 7

Course Outline: SPEE1020

SPEE 1020 Interpersonal Communication 3
Description
SPEE 1030 This course studies the cultural differences and how it affects communication. Topics include definitions of communication; definitions of culture and diversity of cultural patterns; cultural variables influencing communication such as language, non-verbal behavior, perception, values, and beliefs; facts that facilitate or inhibit intercultural communiction; and examination of American culture in camparison to other cultures. Offered fall and spring semesters. Meets MnTC Goals 7 and 8. Prerequisite: None.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 06/01/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 7,8

Course Outline: SPEE1030

SPEE 1030 Intercultural Communications 3

GOAL 8 — Global Perspective

To increase students’ understanding of the growing interdependence of nations and peoples and develop their ability to apply a comparative perspective to cross-cultural social, economic and political experiences. MnTC completion requires one course.

Description
HIST 1300 Big History is a new approach to World History that widens the scale of study from a few thousand years to the entire past. Rather than studying World History through the lenses of different cultures, nations, and civilizations, Big History starts 13 billion years ago and attempts to place the human species in the context of the universe. This course begins with the scientific account of the universe's beginnings and then describes the formation of the earth including its flora and fauna. The majority of the course concentrates on the major trends and developments of human societies from the Paleolithic, throughout the agararian, and into the modern era. Prerequisites: College reading level recommended. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 8

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 05/16/2005 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,8

Course Outline: HIST1300

HIST 1300 World History 4
Description
PHIL 1400 This course is about learning the central beliefs of the world's major religions. Through writing, reflection, and presentation, students will explore the basic tenets of the world's major religions, who founded the religion, their main writings or scriptures, and their philosophical underpinnings concerning such issues as definition of religion, the existence of God/gods, faith, reason, ceremonial practices, and their relationship with the world. Meets MnTC Goal 6

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/12/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,8

Course Outline: PHIL1400

PHIL 1400 World Religions 3
Description
SOCY 1210 An examination of the many ways in which the United States is interconnected with other societies in a changing world. This changing globalization process and related problems that threaten human well-being are studied from a sociological perspective. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 8

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 12/28/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,8

Course Outline: SOCY1210

SOCY 1210 Social Issues Changing World 3
Description
SPAN 1100 This course is designed as an introduction to basic Spanish language skills, including listening comprehension, reading, speaking and writing. Students are introduced to cultures of the Spanish speaking countries and develop an understanding and sensitivity to diverse groups. Major grammar focus includes regular and irregular verbs in the present tense, adjective agreement, and discussion of family, school, time, weather, numbers and greetings. Prerequisites: None. (This course is presented for the true beginner, but 1 or 2 years of any H.S. language experience has been helpful.) Meets MnTC Goal 8

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 10/25/2001 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 8

Course Outline: SPAN1100

SPAN 1100 Beginning Spanish I 4
Description
SPAN 1200 This course continues the development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills that were introduced in Beginning Spanish 1100. The course continues emphasis on the cultures of Spanish speaking countries. Major grammar focus includes a review of the present tense, reflexive verbs, regular and irregular forms of the preterit and imperfect, and discussion of travel, pastimes, food, shopping, and your daily routine. Prerequisites: SPAN1100 or its equivalent. (Students who were successful with 2 or 3 years of H.S. Spanish could begin with this class. Those with 4 or more years would be beyond the scope of this class.) Meets MnTC Goal 8

Credits: 4

Effective Dates: 01/07/2002 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 8

Course Outline: SPAN1200

SPAN 1200 Beginning Spanish II 4
Description
SPEE 1030 This course studies the cultural differences and how it affects communication. Topics include definitions of communication; definitions of culture and diversity of cultural patterns; cultural variables influencing communication such as language, non-verbal behavior, perception, values, and beliefs; facts that facilitate or inhibit intercultural communiction; and examination of American culture in camparison to other cultures. Offered fall and spring semesters. Meets MnTC Goals 7 and 8. Prerequisite: None.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 06/01/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 7,8

Course Outline: SPEE1030

SPEE 1030 Intercultural Communications 3

GOAL 9 — Ethical and Civic Responsibility

To develop students’ capacity to identify, discuss, and reflect upon the ethical dimensions of political, social, and personal life and to understand the ways in which they can exercise responsible and productive citizenship. MnTC completion requires one course.

Description
ENGL 1570 The Literature of Nature focuses on the understanding and analysis of humanity's relationship to its environment, as revealed through particular genres, such as the short story, essay, diary, and poetry. We will review the major texts in the literature of nature and look at the ethical and philosophical relationship between humans and nature over the centuries, focusing primarily on North America. Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 9

Credits:

Effective Dates: 11/05/2010 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,9

Course Outline: ENGL1570

ENGL 1570 The Literature of Nature
Description
HIST 1550 Historical introduction to the Vietnam War and the dramatic social, economic, cultural and political transformations of the Vietnam era. Includes the French Conquest, rise of nationalism, WWII and Cold War containment, secret CIA operations, civil rights movement, Environmental movement, Black Power, counterculture, political murder, anti-war movement, Watergate, Pentagon/VA transgressions, normalizations.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/23/2013 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 7,9

Course Outline: HIST1550

HIST 1550 America in the Vietnam Era 3
Description
PHIL 1100 This course is an introduction to the study of ethics. Students will read, discuss, and write about texts from Classical and World philosophy. Emphasis will be placed on the process of criticism and the practical value of the ideas explored. Meets MnTC Goal 9

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/23/2004 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 9

Course Outline: PHIL1100

PHIL 1100 Ethics 3
Description
PHIL 1300 This course is an introduction to the traditional problems of philosphy. Students will discuss and criticize texts written by philosophers from a variety of periods and cultures. Emphasis will be placed on the practical value of the ideas explored. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 9

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/14/2008 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,9

Course Outline: PHIL1300

PHIL 1300 Introduction to Philosphy 3
Description
PHIL 1350 This course introduces students to basic issues in medical ethics. Emphasis will be placed on the process of considering ethical theory, ethical principles, laws, and professional codes of onduct in the analysis of specific cases from the field. This course will be of special interest to students in nursing and dental programs, though students in any program will find the study of medical ethics worthwhile. Suggested Accuplacer reading cut score over 78 and completion of ENGL 1150: Composition I. Meets MnTC Goal 6 and Goal 9

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 08/24/2009 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 6,9

Course Outline: PHIL1350

PHIL 1350 Medical Ethics 3
Description
POLS 1100 This course is a survey of American Government with a focus on political theory and history, the U.S. Constitution, the branches of the federal government, and the concept of civil liberties and rights. Students will be introduced to the party system and political process in the U.S., the impact of public opinion, mass media/Internet, and interest groups. And overview of public policy and state and local government will also be provided. Prerequisites: None.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/21/2012 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: POLS1100

POLS 1100 The American Political System 3
Description
SOCY 1110 This course covers the basic concepts and terminology used in sociological studies. Sociology is broadly defined as the study of human social organization and social behavior including its forms and consequences. It will focus on the characteristics of human group life as they relate to the structure of the social environment and its influence on the individual. This course is designed to introduce students to the theories, concepts and areas of inquiry that typically characterize sociological analyses. Students will have the opportunity to examine the ethical/dimensions and issues facing political, social, and personal life as it relates to the topics in Sociology. Students will explore their own citizenship and find ways to apply their ideas and goals to civic learning and service learning through embracing facets of human society and the human condition. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 9

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 04/05/1999 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: SOCY1110

SOCY 1110 Introduction to Sociology 3
Description
SOCY 1250 A sociological examination of juvenile delinquency and society's response to delinquent youth. The juvenile justice system and the rights and responsibilities of children under law. Major topics include the historical foundations of delinquency, emphasis on micro and macro level of struggle in which delinquent behavior takes place, critique of current sociological theories on delinquency, sociological and social psychological causes of delinquency, juvenile justice response to delinquency, and citizen responsibility. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 9

Credits: 2

Effective Dates: 01/13/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: SOCY1250

SOCY 1250 Juvenile Delinquency 2
Description
SOCY 1400 This course will provide an overview of the philosophy of criminal law and deviance, and of the nature and extent of crime in America. The theory, structure, and operation of each of the principle components of the Criminal Justice System (ie. police, courts, and corrections) will be examined in detail. Major topics include the historical foundations of our Criminal Justice System, critique of current sociological theories on crime, analysis of impact of legal and social systems on human behavior, rehabilitation, public safety (including homeland security), and citizen responsibility. We will create a learning environment that takes into account all backgrounds and experiences where we can learn from one another.

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 02/16/2011 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,9

Course Outline: SOCY1400

SOCY 1400 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3

GOAL 10 — People and the Environment

To improve students’ understanding of today’s complex environmental challenges. Students will examine the inter-relatedness of human society and the natural environment. Knowledge of both bio-physical principles and socio-cultural systems is the foundation for integrative and critical thinking about environmental issues. MnTC completion requires one course.

Description
BIOL 1110 This course emphasizes the fundamental concepts of ecology as it pertains to the impact of humans on their environment. It addresses the demands placed on the biosphere by the exploitation of natural resources and energy, the creation of pollution and the disposal of waste. This course is interdisciplinary, combining concepts from the natural and physical sciences (e.g. biology, chemistry, geology, physics) with the social sciences (e.g. economics, politics, ethics, history) to present an understanding of how wise stewardship of earth's resources can result in the long-term sustainability of our shared environment. Meets MnTC Goal 3 and MnTC Goal 10

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 02/24/2000 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 3,10

Course Outline: BIOL1110

BIOL 1110 Environmental Science 3
Description
BIOL 1200 This interdisciplinary course explores the interaction between complex human perspectives and the technical and scientific aspects of biology. Issues with a biological basis such as human health, environmental safety, biodiversity, agriculture, and natural resources naturally lead to applied ethical, social, political, and economic questions. Students will explore the technical aspects of timely biological issues, breakthroughs, and technological applications in the context of their societal implications. Meets MnTC Goal 10

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/13/2003 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 10

Course Outline: BIOL1200

BIOL 1200 Biology and Society 3
Description
HIST 1400 This 100% on-line lecture course examines the interaction between humans and the natural world in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. In addition, heavy emphasis is placed on recent Minnesota environmental history. The course considers such diverse topics as the industrialization and urban growth on the environment, the emergence of ecology and green politics, and creation of the idea of Nature in American culture. Students will be expected to develop a historical understanding of the major themes of modern American environmental history; relationships between human activity and pollution in cities, emergence of reform movements and environmental regulations, relationships between increasing urban growth and increasing environmental concern, and the rise of environmental politics in both local and national settings. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and MnTC Goal 10

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 05/15/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,10

Course Outline: HIST1400

HIST 1400 American Environmental History 3
Description
SOCY 1300 Anthropology is the scientific and humanistic study of humankind in all its varieties and of human nature in its universal sense. This course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology: archaeology, cultural anthropology, languages and culture, and physical anthropology. Students will learn to identify and apply anthropological methods of study through a sociological and anthropological approach to humanity. Prerequisites: None. Meets MnTC Goal 5 and Goal 10

Credits: 3

Effective Dates: 01/09/2006 - 12/31/9999

MNTC Goals: 5,10

Course Outline: SOCY1300

SOCY 1300 Introduction to Anthropology 3

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum Completion

Completion of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) may require additional courses beyond those required for the A.S., A.A.S., or diploma. If the intent is to transfer to another college, it is advisable to contact the transfer college for course selection recommendations and transfer admission process information. If a transfer college has not yet been identified, then use the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum courses listed on the following pages as a guide for course selection.

Successful completion of at least 40 credits within the accepted 10 goal areas, as outlined below, constitutes completion of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum at DCTC. The goal area completion requirement is listed in italic text after the goal area descriptive paragraph. Notation of MnTC completion can be added to a student’s transcript upon request after completion.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum Archives

Year Title Download
2014-2015 2014-15 | MnTC Minnesota Transfer Curriculum - DCTC Download
2013-2014 2013-14 | MnTC Minnesota Transfer Curriculum - DCTC Download